Nobody Said Not to Go: The Life, Loves, and Adventures of Emily Hahn

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Open Road Media #ad - Emily hahn first challenged traditional gender roles in 1922 when she enrolled in the University of Wisconsin’s all-male College of Engineering, smoking cigars, wearing trousers, and adopting the nickname “Mickey. Her love of writing led her to manhattan, where she sold her first story to the New Yorker in 1929, launching a sixty-eight-year association with the magazine and a lifelong friendship with legendary editor Harold Ross.

With a rich understanding of social history and a keen eye for colorful details and amusing anecdotes, author Ken Cuthbertson brings to life a brilliant, unconventional woman who traveled fearlessly because “nobody said not to go. Hahn wrote hundreds of acclaimed articles and short stories as well as fifty books in many genres, Dorothy Parker, Ernest Hemingway, and counted among her friends Rebecca West, Jomo Kenyatta, James Thurber, and Madame and General Chiang Kai-shek.

Nobody Said Not to Go: The Life, Loves, and Adventures of Emily Hahn #ad - . A rip-roaring bio” of the trailblazing New Yorker journalist that “explores both the passion and dissatisfaction that fueled Hahn’s wanderlust” Entertainment Weekly. Imbued with an intense curiosity and zest for life, hahn traveled to the belgian congo during the great Depression, becoming a Chinese poet’s concubine; had an illegitimate child with the head of the British Secret Service in Hong Kong, working for the Red Cross; set sail for Shanghai, where she carried out underground relief work during World War II; and explored newly independent India in the 1950s.

Back in the united states, Hahn built her literary career while also becoming a pioneer environmentalist and wildlife conservator.

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China to Me: A Partial Autobiography

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Open Road Media #ad - A proud feminist and fearless traveler, carousing, wandering, she set out for China in 1935 and stayed through the early years of the Second Sino-Japanese War, living, loving—and writing. Deemed scandalous at the time of its publication in 1944, Emily Hahn’s now classic memoir of her years in China remains remarkable for her insights into a tumultuous period and her frankness about her personal exploits.

In this unflinching glimpse of a vanished world, Hahn examines not so much the thorny complications of political blocs and party conflict, but the ordinary—or extraordinary—people caught up in the swells of history. All are shot through with riveting and humanizing detail. Many of the pieces in china to Me were first published as the work of a roving reporter in the New Yorker.

China to Me: A Partial Autobiography #ad - During her travels from nanjing to shanghai, where she lived until the Japanese invasion in 1941, and Hong Kong, Chongqing, Hahn embarks upon an affair with lauded Chinese poet Shao Xunmei; gets a pet gibbon and names him Mr. Mills; establishes a close bond with the women who would become the subjects of her bestselling book The Soong Sisters; battles an acquired addiction to opium; and has a child with Charles Boxer, a married British intelligence officer.

. At heart, china to me is a self-portrait of a fascinating woman ahead of her time. A candid, rollicking literary travelogue from a pioneering New Yorker writer, an intrepid heroine who documented China in the years before World War II.

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The Soong Sisters

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Open Road Media #ad - It also chronicles the changes to Shanghai as they relate to a very eccentric family that had the courage to speak out against the ruling regime. Greatly influencing the history of modern china, they interacted with their government and military to protect the lives of those who could not be heard, and they appealed to the West to support China during the Japanese invasion.

 . As told with wit and verve by emily hahn, a remarkable woman in her own right, the biography of the Soong Sisters tells the story of China through both world wars. In the early twentieth century, few women in China were to prove so important to the rise of Chinese nationalism and liberation from tradition as the three extraordinary Soong Sisters: Eling, Chingling and Mayling.

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No Hurry to Get Home: A Memoir

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Open Road Media #ad - One of the pieces in the book starts with the line, “Though I had always wanted to be an opium addict, I can’t claim that as a reason why I went to China. Hahn was seized by a wanderlust that led her to explore nearly every corner of the world. She was the concubine of a chinese poet in Shanghai in the 1930s—where she did indeed become an opium addict for two years.

. A fascinating memoir by a free-spirited New Yorker writer, whose wanderlust led her from the Belgian Congo to Shanghai and beyond. For many years, she spent part of every year in New York City and part of her time living with her husband, Charles Boxer, in England. Originally published in 1970, under the title times and Places, this book is a collection of twenty-three of her articles from the New Yorker, published between 1937 and 1970.

No Hurry to Get Home: A Memoir #ad - Well reviewed upon first publication, author of nobody said not to go: the life, a longtime colleague of hers at the New Yorker, the book was re-published under the current title in 2000 with a foreword by Sheila McGrath, and an introduction by Ken Cuthbertson, Loves and Adventures of Emily Hahn. She traveled solo to the Belgian Congo at the age of twenty-five.

Through the course of these twenty-three distinct pieces, Emily Hahn gives us a glimpse of the tremendous range of her interests, the many places in the world she visited, large and small, and her extraordinary perception of the things, that are important in a life.

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Shanghai Grand: Forbidden Love and International Intrigue in a Doomed World

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St. Martin's Press #ad - Emily hahn was a legendary new yorker writer who would cover China for nearly fifty years, and play an integral part in opening Asia up to the West. But danger lurks on the horizon and mickey barely makes it out alive as the brutal Japanese occupation destroys the seductive world of pre-war Shanghai and Mao Tse-tung's Communists come to power in China.

. On the eve of wwii, the foreign-controlled port of Shanghai was the rendezvous for the twentieth century's most outlandish adventurers, all under the watchful eye of the fabulously wealthy Sir Victor Sassoon. But when she meets zau sinmay, a chinese poet from an illustrious family, displaced Chinese peasants, triple agents, opium-smokers, she discovers the real Shanghai through his eyes: the city of rich colonials, and increasingly desperate White Russian and Jewish refugees—a place her innate curiosity will lead her to discover first hand.

Shanghai Grand: Forbidden Love and International Intrigue in a Doomed World #ad - After entering sassoon's glamorous cathay hotel, martha gellhorn, Hahn is absorbed into the social swirl of the expats drawn to pre-war China, among them Ernest Hemingway, Harold Acton, and the colourful gangster named Morris "Two-Gun" Cohen. But at the height of the depression, "mickey" Hahn, had just arrived in Shanghai nursing a broken heart after a disappointing affair with an alcoholic Hollywood screenwriter, convinced she would never love again.

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Grey Wethers

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Open Road Media #ad - When their love is thwarted by lies and deception, Clare accepts an unwelcome proposal from a much older man, and Nicholas is forced into a marriage that will protect his family. Vita sackville-west is celebrated for her evocative depictions of the English countryside in her poetry and novels. A gentleman’s daughter rejects her station in this tale of nineteenth-century love across class boundaries by the acclaimed poet and author of The Edwardians.

In the english village of king’s avon, across the downs from Marlborough, young Clare Warrener lives in the big manor house with her gentleman father. First published in 1923, grey Wethers demonstrates the power of Sackville-West’s lyrical voice. Though nicholas is handsome and capable, his family is the subject of suspicion around town.

Grey Wethers #ad - This ebook has been professionally proofread to ensure accuracy and readability on all devices. Few have been inside the cottage where his mother is housebound, and his brother Olver is known to be simple. But she is increasingly drawn out to the downs where young Nicholas Lovel spends his days tending sheep.

 . But still, the love and freedom they found on the downs beckons them both to return. She is also remembered as the inspiration for the titular character in Virginia Woolf’s classic novel Orlando.

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Coming into the End Zone: A Memoir

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Open Road Media #ad - Coming into the end zone is an account of everything Grumbach observes over the course of a year. Coming into the end zone captures the days of a woman entering a new stage of life with humanity and abiding hope. A new york times notable book: one woman’s search for the value of a long life with the advent of her seventieth birthday, her own increasing infirmities, DC, the premature deaths of her younger friends, and her move from cosmopolitan Washington, many changes have beset Doris Grumbach: the rapidly accelerating speed of the world around her, to the calm of the Maine coast.

Astute observations and vivid memories of quotidian events pepper her story, which surprises even her with its fullness and vigor.

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10 Women Who Changed Science and the World Trailblazers, Pioneers, and Revolutionaries

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Diversion Books #ad - Medicinevirginia apgar united states, 1909–1974 invented the Apgar score, used to quickly assess the health of newborn babies. These women overcame significant obstacles, discrimination, and personal tragedies in their pursuit of scientific advancement. Ten women who changed science and the World tells the stories of trailblazing women who made a historic impact on physics, biology, chemistry, astronomy, and medicine.

Rachel carson united states, 1907–1964 forged the environmental movement, most famously with her influential book Silent Spring. Elsie widdowson united kingdom, 1906–2000 pioneered the science of nutrition and helped devise the World War II food-rationing program. By daring to ask ‘how?’ and ‘why?’, each of these women made a positive impact on the world we live in today.

10 Women Who Changed Science and the World Trailblazers, Pioneers, and Revolutionaries #ad - Dorothy crowfoot hodgkin united kingdom, 1910–1994 won the Nobel Prize for Chemistry in 1964 and pioneered the X-ray study of large molecules of biochemical importance. Chien-shiung wu united states, 1912–1997 demonstrated that the widely accepted ‘law of parity’, which stated that left-spinning and right-spinning subatomic particles would behave identically, was wrong.

. Chemistrymarie curie france, 1867–1934 became the only person in history to have won Nobel prizes in two different fields of science. Included in this volume are famous figures, such as two-time Nobel Prize winner Marie Curie, as well as individuals whose names will be new to many, though their breakthroughs were no less remarkable.

In this book, 1868–1921 discovered the period-luminosity relationship for Cepheid variable stars, you will learn about:  AstronomyHenrietta Leavitt United States, which enabled us to measure the size of our galaxy and the universe.

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The View from the Ground

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Atlantic Monthly Press #ad - Informed by the horrors of fascism in spain and germany, and by the courage of those who stand up to the thugs both in an out of government, like its companion volume,  The Face of War, the modern terror in Central America,  The View from the Ground is a singular act of testimony that, is “an eloquent, unforgettable history of a chaotic century” San Francisco Chronicle.

That is to say, the countries in the background were at peace at the moment of writing; not that there was peace on earth. Included here are accounts of america during the depression, domestic life in Africa, protests at the White House, Israel and Palestine in the 1950s, post-Franco Spain, and Gellhorn’s return to Cuba after a forty-one-year absence—among many other topics.

The View from the Ground #ad - . The view from the ground, as Gellhorn explains, “is a selection of articles written during six decades; peace-time reporting. An anthology spanning six decades of on-the-scene journalism from “one of the most eloquent witnesses of the twentieth century” Bill Buford,  Granta. For nearly sixty years, martha Gellhorn traveled the globe to report on the tumult and extremity of life in the twentieth century.

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Lawrence Durrell's Notes on Travel Volume One: Blue Thirst, Sicilian Carousel, and Bitter Lemons of Cyprus

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Open Road Media #ad - Their real-life family is portrayed in the PBS Masterpiece production, The Durrells in Corfu. Winner of the duff cooper Prize, this memoir is an elegant picture of island life in a changing world. Blue thirst: in the first of a pair of lectures, durrell recalls his family’s time living on the Greek island of Corfu, expanding on his eloquent memoir, given during a 1970s visit to California, Prospero’s Cell.

Over the following decades, he rambled around the Mediterranean, and Greece, making homes in Egypt, Cyprus, always bringing his poet’s eye to document his experiences. Never for a moment does Durrell lose the poet’s touch. The new york Times. Durrell’s travel books arrive like long letters from a civilized and very funny friend.

Lawrence Durrell's Notes on Travel Volume One: Blue Thirst, Sicilian Carousel, and Bitter Lemons of Cyprus #ad - Time  sicilian carousel: for years, durrell’s friend Martine had begged him to visit her on the sun-kissed paradise of Sicily, but it took her sudden death to finally bring him to the island’s shores. When the second world war came to the Mediterranean, Durrell was swept into diplomatic service, an adventure he vividly recounts in his powerful second lecture.

Brilliant depth of language .  .  . Gathering slowly from the lighter delightful pages to its lost and questioning end.

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Congo Solo

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MQUP #ad - Here - restored to the form she had intended - is hahn's unforgettable narrative, sexism, brutality, and at times disturbing first-hand account of the racism, provocative, a vivid, and exploitation that were everyday life realities under Belgium's iron-fisted colonial rule. Until now, the few copies of congo solo in circulation were the adulterated version, which the author altered after pressure from her publisher and threats of litigation from the main character's family.

A woman who lived life on her own terms, Hahn was an unknown and struggling writer when Congo Solo was published. This edition makes available a lost treasure of women's travel writing that shocks and impresses, while shedding valuable light on the gender and race politics of the period.

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